Mission

The National Network for Safe Communities supports cities implementing proven strategic interventions to reduce violence and improve public safety, minimize arrest and incarceration, strengthen communities, and improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities it serves. The National Network is committed to building a community of practice that operates along a set of guiding principles:

First do no harm

Strengthen communities’ capacity to prevent violence

Enhance legitimacy

Offer help to those who want it

Get deterrence right

Use enforcement strategically

Strategies

News & Updates

  • Violent Crime in the United States: Focus, Prevention and Legitimacy

    April 2018  |  The United States Studies Centre  

    PODCAST: Following the recent March for Our Lives, gun violence is front and centre in America’s law and order debate. Join us at our upcoming event in collaboration with the National Network for Safe Communities looking at how cities implement strategies to reduce violence, improve public safety and minimise arrest and incarceration. Can certain interventions improve relationships between law enforcement and the communities it serves?

    Tags: NNSC International

  • Ulster County launches first-in-NY effort to reduce domestic violence by intimate partners

    April 2018  |  Daily Freeman  

    The National Network for Safe Communities’ Intimate Partner Violence Intervention (IPVI) was introduced during a press conference Tuesday afternoon at City Hall. Ulster County District Attorney Holley Carnright, flanked by cardboard silhouettes representing 11 local women killed by their partners, said the initiative uses statistical analysis and data from different agencies to identify people who might commit intimate partner violence.

    “Once we’ve identified a person who we think is going to commit domestic violence again, we have personal contact with them,” Carnright said. “In addition to the personal contact we have with the offender or potential offender, we have a parallel process where we engage the victims. We do what we’ve been doing for a while. We try to educate the victims, make sure they understand about services that are available to them.”

    Tags: Kingston Intimate Partner Violence Intervention

  • Domestic abusers: Dangerous for women — and lethal for cops

    April 2018  |  USA TODAY  

    One local police department has spent the past six years pioneering a strategy that can help identify domestic violence abusers. High Point, N.C., had a problem. From 2004 to 2008, one-third of the city’s murders were related to intimate partner violence, well above both the state and national averages, according to former police chief Jim Fealy. So in 2009, the police department, in partnership with the National Network for Safe Communities, began to take action. Its approach tracks alleged abusers and intervenes accordingly depending upon the severity of the violence. From 2012, when the strategy was implemented, to 2014, there was just one intimate partner violence homicide in the city, compared with 17 from 2004 to 2011. Calls to police in High Point to report intimate partner violence declined by 20%, as did arrests, and the percentage of victims who were injured also dropped from 2012 to 2014.

    Tags: High Point Intimate Partner Violence Intervention

  • Taking Aim at Gun Violence, With Personal Deterrence

    April 2018  |  New York Times  

    In this opinion piece for the New York Times, Tina Rosenberg highlights the NNSC's group violence prevention work across jurisdictions. 

    In Pittsburgh, homicides hit a 12-year low in 2017; the mayor credited Ceasefire. Detroit’s homicide rate hit a 50-year low in 2017. Its police chief, James Craig, said in an interview that the city had started Ceasefire in two high-crime precincts in 2015 and has gradually expanded it. “I wasn’t much of a believer when I first got to Detroit,” he said. “But what we have in place now is probably one of the better-working Ceasefire models. It has had a profound impact on sustaining violent crime reduction.”

    In Newburgh, statistics in a voluminous New York State report show shootings are way down (See pdf, page 1202) — from 55 victims in 2015 to 17 last year. Violent crime, especially firearm crime, has plummeted. In 2012, the year Oakland began its current version of Ceasefire, it was the third-most dangerous American city, with 126 murders. Last year it had 74. In 2017, Oakland had 277 nonfatal shootings — down from 557 in 2012.

    Tags: DetroitNewburghOaklandPittsburgh Group Violence Intervention Custom NotificationsSupport and Outreach

  • Pittsburgh gun violence drops to 12-year low; mayor credits police anti-gang efforts

    March 2018  |  Pittsburgh Post-Gazette  

    Through Tuesday afternoon, the city had seen 14 non-fatal shootings in 2018, Cmdr. Joseph said, compared to 31 through the same period last year — a 55 percent decrease.

    He attributes the decline to the bureau’s Group Violence Intervention [GVI], a strategy that aims to reduce gang-related gun violence by targeting the city’s most violent gang members while also offering social services and support to those who agree to stop shooting.

    Tags: Pittsburgh National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice Group Violence Intervention Support and Outreach

  • Case Study: Using DMI to Combat Covert Opioid Markets

    March 2018  |  Police Chief Magazine  

    Today’s opioid markets are different from the open-air drug markets that were subject to special attention in past DMI implementations; they are, in particular, covert rather than overt. People are not, for the most part, standing out on street corners selling opioids or operating flagrant drug houses. The role that was played by geographic location in overt markets is instead played by social networks of dealers and addicts. But, within those networks, potentially similar elements operate: supply, demand, and the need for the successful functioning of markets. In principle, as long as the structure of an opioid market can be analyzed and its key dynamics identified, the logic of market disruption might be applicable. In considering a “covert market” DMI, the two most pressing practical questions seem to be: (1) Is it possible to identify the shape of the market and, especially, the key dealers in it? and (2) Is the number of key dealers manageably small, and can we imagine a practical and potentially meaningful intervention?

    Tags: Rutland Drug Market Intervention


NNSC Impact

23%

reduction in overall shooting behavior among factions represented at call-ins

Chicago

27%

reduction in shootings among notified violent groups

Boston

41%

reduction in group member-involved homicide

Cincinnati

36.4%

reduction in gang-involved shootings among gangs treated with crackdowns

Boston

44-56%

reduction in drug offenses in all 4 neighborhoods

High Point

32%

decrease in group member-involved homicides

New Orleans

32%

reduction in victimization among factions represented at call-ins

Chicago

55%

reduction in drug offenses

Nashville

44%

reduction in gun assaults through Project Safe Neighborhooods

Lowell