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Executive Session

Partnering with prosecutors, academics, and community members, the IIP is guiding the high-level thinking and action for shifting the culture and goals of the profession. The Executive Session is working to create a prosecution model that prioritizes prevention and community wellbeing over case processing and conviction. 


Lenore Anderson

Executive Director
Californians for Safety and Justice


Roy Austin

Partner
Harris, Wiltshire, & Grannis LLP


Sherry Boston

District Attorney
DeKalb County, GA


John Chisholm

District Attorney
Milwaukee, WI


John J. Choi

County Attorney
Ramsey Count, MN


Darcel Clark

District Attorney
Bronx County, NY


Christine Cole

Executive Director
Crime and Justice Institute at Community Resources for Justice


Scott Colom

District Attorney
16th District, MS


Angela Davis

Law Professor
American University Washington College of Law


James Doyle

Founder
National Institute of Justice Sentinel Events Initiative


Kim Foxx

State's Attorney
Cook County, IL


Karen Friedman Agnifilo

Chief Assistant District Attorney
Manhattan District Attorney's Office


Adam Gelb

Director of Public Safety Performance Project
Pew Charitable Trusts


Mark Gonzalez

District Attorney
Nueces County, TX


Bob Gualtieri

Sheriff
Pinellas County, FL


Frank Hartmann

Senior Research Fellow
Harvard Kennedy School


David Kennedy

Director
National Network for Safe Communities


Marc Levin

Director
Center for Effective Justice at the Texas Public Policy Foundation


Glenn E. Martin

President and Founder
JustLeadershipUSA


Carlos J. Martinez

Public Defender
Miami Dade, FL


Beth McCann

District Attorney
Denver, CO


Hillar Moore

District Attorney
Baton Rouge, LA


Jean Peters Baker

County Prosecutor
Kansas City, MO


Charles H. Ramsey

Former Police Commissioner
Philadelphia Police Department


Lucy Lang

Executive Director
Institute for Innovation in Prosecution


Jeff Robinson

Deputy Legal Director & Director
Trone Center for Justice and Equality


Dan Satterberg

Prosecuting Attorney
King County, WA


David Sklansky

Stanley Morrison Professor of Law
Stanford Law School


Carter Stewart

Managing Director
Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation


Jeremy Travis

Senior Vice President of Criminal Justice
Laura and John Arnold Foundation


Cyrus Vance

District Attorney
New York County, NY


Tori Verber Salazar

District Attorney
San Joaquin County, CA


Lynneice Washington

District Attorney
Jefferson County, AL


Ronald Wright

Law Professor
Wake Forest University


Ellen Yaroshefsky

Howard Lichtenstein Professor of Legal Ethics & Director
Monroe Freedman Institute for the Study of Legal Ethics

Lenore Anderson

Executive Director, Californians for Safety and Justice

Lenore is the founder and President of Alliance for Safety and Justice, and founder and Executive Director of Californians for Safety and Justice. She is an attorney with extensive experience working to improve our criminal justice system. She is a regular commentator in the media about challenges within our prison and justice system and new approaches to smart justice. Lenore was the Campaign Chair and co-author of Proposition 47, a California ballot initiative passed by voters in November 2014 to reduce incarceration and reallocate prison spending to mental health, drug treatment, K-12 programs and victim services. The initiative represents the first time in the nation voters have elected to reclassify multiple sections of the penal code to reduce incarceration and reallocate prison spending to communities. Previously, Lenore served as Chief of Policy and Chief of the Alternative Programs Division at the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office, where she spearheaded initiatives to reduce recidivism and improve public safety. She also crafted local and state legislation to aid victims of domestic violence, protect violent crime witnesses, reduce elementary school truancy and reduce recidivism. Lenore also previously served as Director of Public Safety for the Oakland Mayor, overseeing the Mayor’s violence-reduction and police recruitment initiatives, and as Director of the San Francisco Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice. There she oversaw $10 million in violence-prevention grants, advised the Mayor on public safety matters, and launched a citywide gun buy-back program, Community Policing Task Force and Juvenile Justice Task Force. Lenore serves on the Advisory Board of the Innovations in Prosecution initiative of John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She is also a cofounder and served as the inaugural Chair of the Board of the Center for Youth Wellness, an initiative to reduce the health impacts of toxic stress on urban youth. She holds a J.D. from NYU School of Law and a B.A. from UC Berkeley, and lives with her family in Oakland, California.

Roy Austin

Partner, Harris, Wiltshire, & Grannis LLP

Roy L. Austin, Jr. joined the D.C. law firm Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP as a partner in 2017. Mr. Austin began his career as an Honors Trial Attorney with the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division investigating and prosecuting hate crime and police brutality cases around the country. In 2002, he joined the D.C. U.S. Attor- ney’s Office where he prosecuted domestic violence, adult and child sexual assault, human trafficking, homicide and fraud and public corruption cases. In 2009, Mr. Austin returned to the D.C. U.S. Attorney’s Office as Co- ordinator of the D.C. Human Trafficking Task Force. In January 2010, Mr. Austin was appointed Deputy Assis- tant Attorney General (DAAG), Civil Rights Division where he supervised the Criminal Section, and the Special Litigation Section’s law enforcement (police departments, corrections and juvenile justice) portfolio. Among numerous other matters, Mr. Austin worked on cases involving the New Orleans Police Department, Missoula law enforcement and the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office. In March 2014, Mr. Austin joined the White House Domestic Policy Council as Deputy Assistant to the President for the Office of Urban Affairs, Justice and Opportunity. In this position, Mr. Austin co-authored a report on Big Data and Civil Rights, worked with the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, helped develop the Police Data Initiative, worked on expanding reentry assistance and was a member of President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Task Force. He has served as an adjunct trial advocacy professor at George Washington University Law School and the Washington College of Law. Mr. Austin received his B.A. from Yale University and his J.D. from The University of Chicago.

Sherry Boston

District Attorney, DeKalb County, GA

As District Attorney for the Stone Mountain Judicial Circuit, Sherry Boston oversees the prosecution of felony offenses filed in the Superior Court of DeKalb County, including murder, drug and sex offenses, child and elder abuse, theft, and corruption. Prior to this role, District Attorney Boston served as DeKalb County Solicitor-General, the elected prosecutor overseeing misdemeanor crimes. In addition to her elected positions, District Attorney Boston has also received several notable appointments. She was the first woman appointed as Municipal Court Judge for the City of Dunwoody and served as Associate Magistrate Judge for DeKalb County. In addition to her judicial service, Ms. Boston has also worked in private practice handling thousands of misdemeanor and felony criminal cases in metro Atlanta. District Attorney Boston is an active member of the State Bar of Georgia and currently chairs the Investigative Panel of the State Disciplinary Board. District Attorney Boston also serves on the Board of Governors, the State Bar’s policymaking arm. In addition to her varied State Bar roles, District Attorney Boston is an instructor for Basic Litigation for the Prosecuting Attorneys’ Council of Georgia and is regularly called upon to speak to local and national audiences on a number of issues related to law enforcement, trial preparation and cross-examination strategies. Throughout her career, Ms. Boston has received numerous awards and recognition for her work and commitment to important causes such as domestic violence awareness and prevention/intervention initiatives. District Attorney Boston is a graduate of Villanova University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Emory University School of Law.

John Chisholm

District Attorney, Milwaukee, WI

John T. Chisholm is the District Attorney of Milwaukee County. As District Attorney, Mr. Chisholm organizes his office to work closely with neighborhoods through his nationally recognized Community Prosecution program. He designed a Child Protection Advocacy Unit to better serve child victims, formed a Public Integrity Unit to focus on public corruption matters and a Witness Protection Unit to thwart attempts to intimidate victims and witnesses of crime. 

Mr. Chisholm is an Army Veteran and worked with the Veterans’ Administration and collaborative partners to establish resources for veterans who encounter the criminal justice system in Milwaukee County, resulting in the opening of the Veterans Treatment Initiative and Treatment Court. 

Mr. Chisholm is a graduate of Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin Law School.

John J. Choi

County Attorney, Ramsey Count, MN

John Choi made history on January 3, 2011, when he was sworn in as the first Korean-American chief prosecutor in the country. Since taking office, he has become a state and national leader in the fight against sex trafficking. Mr. Choi’s innovative approach to holding abusers accountable, while working collaboratively with advocacy agencies to help victims, has transformed the way government intervenes in domestic violence and sex trafficking situations. In addition, Mr. Choi has been a champion of engaging men to prevent violence against women and children; successfully advanced legislation to reunite families when it’s in foster children’s best interest; implemented new performance-based outcomes for juvenile diversion programs; developed the use of lethality assessment protocols and GPS technology to keep domestic violence victims safe; created precharge diversion for adults; and established a Veterans Court. Throughout his public tenure, Mr. Choi has been innovative in reforming and finding efficiencies in the criminal justice system. In his previous capacity as Saint Paul City Attorney, Mr. Choi was recognized with the International Municipal Lawyers Association’s top award for distinguished public service. Prior to his successful career in the public sector, Mr. Choi spent a decade in private practice, making partner in six years while focused on government relations, administrative law, municipal law and civil litigation. Mr. Choi holds a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Marquette University, a J.D. from Hamline University School of Law, and was a Humphrey Fellow at the University of Minnesota.

Darcel Clark

District Attorney, Bronx County, NY

Darcel Denise Clark became the 13th District Attorney for Bronx County on January 1, 2016. She is the first woman in that position and the first African-American woman to be a District Attorney in New York State.

District Attorney Clark also served as an Associate Justice for the NYS Supreme Court Appellate Division, First Department; a NYS Supreme Court Justice in Bronx County; and a Criminal Court Judge in Bronx and New York Counties. She spent more than 16 years on the bench. District Attorney Clark is a lifelong Bronxite, raised in NYCHA’s Soundview Houses. She received her Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from Boston College, where she was the first recipient of the University’s Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Scholarship, and earned her law degree at the Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C. District Attorney Clark began her legal career at the Bronx District Attorney’s Office in 1986, prosecuting many cases, including drug felonies, violent crimes and homicides. District Attorney Clark served as a Supervising ADA in the Narcotics Bureau and the Deputy Chief of the Criminal Court Bureau. In 1999, she left the Office for her first judicial post. District Attorney Clark also serves on the Boston College Board of Trustees and has served in leadership positions in the National Association of Women Judges and the Black Bar Association of Bronx County. She is married to Eaton “Ray” Davis, a veteran NYPD Detective. Throughout her career in public service, District Attorney Clark has endeavored to earn the trust of the people of the Bronx. In her new role, she hopes to make the Bronx District Attorney’s Office a beacon of swift, certain justice for all.

Christine Cole

Executive Director, Crime and Justice Institute at Community Resources for Justice

Christine Cole currently serves as Executive Director at the Crime and Justice Institute at CRJ, Ms. Cole manages multiple project teams, including the internal Standards and Quality Assurance Unit, 37 staff, and oversees $6.8M in research and technical assistance projects across all facets of the justice and safety sector in the US. Ms. Cole is the former Executive Director of the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at Harvard Kennedy School and she has worked in local, regional and state levels of government in safety and justice. During her more than 30 years in the sector she has worked in policing, institutional and community-based corrections, victim advocacy, and community organizing, and emergency response planning as well as part of a prosecution team. Ms. Cole has executive level management and supervisory experience and has served as a change agent across and within sectors. She has extensive experience as a collaborator and facilitator with practitioners, community members, and academics. She has previously worked on safety and justice reform in Africa, Europe, Latin America, Asia, and the Pacific dedicated toward measurement of system improvement and reform.

Scott Colom

District Attorney, 16th District, MS

Scott Colom is native of Columbus, MS. He received a Bachelor of Arts in English and History from Millsaps College. After college, Mr. Colom was selected to teach in Guyana, South America by World Teach, a non-prof- it, non-governmental organization based at the Center for International Development at Harvard University. While participating in the program, Mr. Colom taught English in a small rural town in Guyana. Mr. Colom is also a graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, where he graduated cum laude. While in law school, Mr. Colom interned with the Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania, and was one of twenty-five students nationwide awarded a summer honors internship with the United States Department of Justice. After law school, Mr. Colom was one of 28 young legal professionals nationwide to be awarded a Skadden Fellowship to work with the Mississippi Center for Justice. During the fellowship, Mr. Colom worked with a group of non-profits to help develop affordable, asset building alternatives to predatory lending. In 2011, Scott Colom was appointed the youngest and first African American justice court judge in Lowndes County history. In 2013, he was appointed the first African American prosecutor for the city of Columbus. In 2015, he was elected District Attorney for Circuit Court District Sixteen, which includes Lowndes, Oktibbeha, Clay and Noxubee counties.

Angela Davis

Law Professor, American University Washington College of Law

Angela J. Davis is a Professor of Law at the American University Washington College of Law where she teaches Criminal Law and related courses. Professor Davis is the author of Arbitrary Justice: The Power of the American Prosecutor (Oxford University Press, 2007), the editor of Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution and Imprisonment (Penguin Random House, 2017 (Forthcoming), co-editor of Trial Stories (with Professor Michael E. Tigar) (Foundation Press, 2007), and a co-author of Criminal Law (with Professor Katheryn Russell-Brown) (Sage Publications, 2015) and the 6th edition of Basic Criminal Procedure (with Professors Stephen Saltzburg and Daniel Capra) (Thomson West, 2012). Professor Davis’ other publications include articles and book chapters on prosecutorial discretion and racism in the criminal justice system. She received the Washington College of Law’s Pauline Ruyle Moore award for scholarly contribution in the area of public law in 2000 and 2009, the American University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in a Full-Time Appointment in 2002, the American University Faculty Award for Outstanding Scholarship in 2009, and the American University Scholar/Teacher of the Year Award in 2015. Professor Davis was awarded a Soros Senior Justice Fellowship in 2004. Prior to joining the academy, she served as Director, Deputy Director and staff attorney at the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia. Professor Davis is a former law clerk of the Honorable Theodore R. Newman of the D. C. Court of Appeals and is a graduate of Howard University and Harvard Law School.

James Doyle

Founder, National Institute of Justice Sentinel Events Initiative

James Doyle, of counsel to Bassil & Budreau in Boston, Massachusetts, is a veteran litigator and writer. The former head of the statewide Public Defender Division of the Committee for Public Counsel Services in Massachusetts, his experience includes constitutional litigation, numerous homicide trials and appeals, the representation of crime victims, and important civil rights cases. He is the author of True Witness, (2005) the history of the collision between the science of memory and the legal system and the co-author (with Elizabeth Loftus) of Eyewitness Testimony: Civil and Criminal, the principal treatise for lawyers in eyewitness cases. He has published numerous articles on evidence, race in criminal justice, and capital punishment.  He was a faculty member at the Georgetown University Law Center, where he also served as Deputy Director of the Criminal Justice Clinic. He was the founding Director of The Center for Modern Forensic Practice at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and its Arson Screening Project. During 2012-2014, he was a Visiting Fellow at the National Institute of Justice, where he devised and launched NIJ’s Sentinel Events Initiative, and authored the principal essay in the NIJ’s Special Report, Mending Justice: Sentinel Event Reviews. He is an Advisor to the American Law Institute’s Project on Policing and a consultant to the National Institute of Justice. He received his B.A. from Trinity College, J.D. from Northwestern University School of Law, and LL.M from Georgetown University Law Center, where he was an E. Barrett Prettyman/LEAA Fellow.

Kim Foxx

State's Attorney, Cook County, IL

Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx is an accomplished leader, prosecutor, and advocate for children and families in Cook County. Born to a teenage mother who struggled to make ends meet, and raised on Chicago’s Near North Side by her mother and grandmother, Ms. Foxx’s life experience has given her a deep understanding of the impact of crime, violence and poverty on our communities. She began her career as a guardian ad litem with the Cook County Public Guardian’s Office and then became an Assistant State’s Attorney for Cook County, where she served for 12 years. Most recently, Ms. Foxx served as Chief of Staff for Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle where she was the lead architect of the criminal justice reform agenda.

Karen Friedman Agnifilo

Chief Assistant District Attorney, Manhattan District Attorney's Office

Karen Friedman Agnifilo serves as Chief Assistant District Attorney of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. As Chief Assistant DA, Ms. Friedman Agnifilo oversees an office of approximately 500 lawyers, 700 support staff and roughly 80,000 cases per year. In addition to overseeing the work of the office, she is also responsible for overseeing all policy related matters including the Office’s Criminal Justice Investment Initiative, which seeks to transform the Criminal Justice System by investing more than $800 million criminal asset forfeiture funds in projects that improve public safety, prevent crime, and promote a fair and efficient justice system. Ms. Fried- man Agnifilo rejoined the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office in 2010 as Executive ADA and Chief of the Trial Division, leaving her position as General Counsel to the New York City Mayor’s Criminal Justice Coordinator. In that capacity, she managed multi-agency criminal justice policy initiatives and projects and helped shape New York City’s criminal justice legislative and policy agendas. Her areas of focus have included human trafficking; internet safety; sexual assault; DNA; domestic violence; mental health; technology projects; juvenile justice; identity theft; and fraud. Ms. Friedman Agnifilo previously served for 14 years as an Assistant District Attorney in Manhattan, including four years as Deputy Chief of the Sex Crimes Unit. She also served in the Homicide Investigation Unit, the Family Violence and Child Abuse Bureau, and the Asian Gang Unit. Ms. Friedman Agnifilo is a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles and a 1992 graduate of Georgetown University Law Center.

Adam Gelb

Director of Public Safety Performance Project , Pew Charitable Trusts

Adam Gelb directs Pew’s public safety performance project, which helps states advance policies and practices in adult and juvenile sentencing and corrections that protect public safety, hold offenders accountable, and control corrections costs. As the project lead, Mr. Gelb oversees Pew’s assistance to states seeking a greater public safety return on their corrections spending. He also supervises a vigorous research portfolio that highlights strategies for reducing recidivism while cutting costs. Mr. Gelb speaks frequently with the media about national trends and state innovations, and regularly advises policy makers on implementation of practical, cost-effective policies. Mr. Gelb has been involved in crime control and prevention issues for the past 28 years as a journalist, congressional aide, and senior state government official. He began his career as a reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and staffed the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee during negotiations and final passage of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. From 1995 to 2000, as policy director for the lieu- tenant governor of Maryland, Mr. Gelb was instrumental in developing several nationally recognized anti-crime initiatives. He served as executive director of the Georgia Sentencing Commission from 2001 to 2003. Before joining Pew, he was vice president for programs at the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse. Mr. Gelb graduated from the University of Virginia and holds a master’s degree from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.

Mark Gonzalez

District Attorney, Nueces County, TX

Becoming a father at 21 proved challenging, but Mark Gonzalez believes the strongest character is forged in the crucible of adversity. Mr. Gonzalez worked construction to pay his way through college, graduating from Texas A&M Corpus Christi in 2002. Three years later, he received his law degree from St. Mary’s University School of Law in San Antonio. For a decade, he fought to preserve the rights of citizens throughout South Texas, earning a sterling reputation as a committed, zealous, effective trial lawyer and winning Criminal Defense Lawyer of the Year in 2011 from the Corpus Christi Bar Association. As District Attorney, that same commitment, zeal, and efficacy enables him to effectively seek and secure justice for victims; implement innovative, preventative crime initiatives and programs; and punish violent offenders to the fullest extent of the law. Transparency, efficiency, and community are the three pillars on which Mark’s administration rests. Transparency in the evidence provided to defendants (as required by law); the DA’s office’s relationships with law enforcement; and in all the activities of the office. Efficiency in the appropriate, effective charging of crimes; the prudent use of taxpayer dollars; and in helping to reduce the jail population through timely intake and resolution of cases. Community focus through prosecutor outreach programs in conjunction with law enforcement; soliciting and listening to community concerns regarding crime and public safety; and the implementation of programs aimed at preventing youth crime and appropriately punishing first-time offenders.

Bob Gualtieri

Sheriff, Pinellas County, FL

Bob Gualtieri is the 14th sheriff of Pinellas County in its 104 year history. Sheriff Gualtieri began his career with the Pinellas County Sheriff’s office approximately 35 years ago. He was appointed as sheriff in 2011 and elected and re-elected in 2012 and 2016, respectively. The Pinellas County Sheriff’s office is the 15th largest sheriff’s office in the country with approximately 3,000 employees and an annual budget of $300 million. Sheriff Gualtieri began his law enforcement and public service career as a detention deputy working in the Pinellas County jail. He then joined the Dunedin Police Department as a patrol officer and later rejoined the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office as a law enforcement deputy. Over the next 15 years, Sheriff Gualtieri served in many different components of the agency, including several years conducting domestic and international drug trafficking investigations as part of a DEA task force. Sheriff Gualtieri earned his bachelor’s degree from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg and his law degree from Stetson University College of Law. After graduating from Stetson and being admitted to the Florida Bar, Sheriff Gualtieri entered private practice in Tampa, specializing in labor and employment defense. Sheriff Gualtieri returned to the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office in 2006 as its general counsel and was appointed chief deputy (second in command) in 2008. Sheriff Gualtieri served in the dual role of general counsel and chief deputy until he became sheriff in 2011. Sheriff Gualtieri is a member of the American Bar Association, Federal Bar Association, and the bar associations of Clearwater, St. Petersburg, and Hillsborough County. Sheriff Gualtieri is active in many community organizations and serves on the Pinellas County Homeless Leadership Board, and the boards of directors for the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Suncoast and the Pinellas Sheriff’s Police Athletic League. Sheriff Gualtieri was named 2014 Sheriff of the Year by Crisis Intervention Team International for his work on mental health issues. Sheriff Gualtieri serves on the board of directors of the Florida Sheriff’s Association (FSA) and is chair of the FSA Legislative Committee. He is also an Executive Fellow for the Police Foundation, member of the Major County Sheriff’s Association, National Sheriff’s Association, International Association of Chiefs.

Frank Hartmann

Senior Research Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School

Frank (Francis X.) Hartmann, is a Senior Research Fellow of the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management, Faculty Chair of the Kennedy School’s Program for all incoming mid-careers students, and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy. His current teaching at the Kennedy School, in the management curriculum and in Executive Programs, is on effective implementation: how do we, by our actions, raise the probability that what we say we want to make happen, does happen? He has chaired most of the Kennedy School’s Executive Sessions, including those on Policing, Patient Safety and Errors in Medicine, and Preparedness for Terrorism.  He and Mark Moore developed the Executive Session process. He has also been Visiting Professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at the National University of Singapore three separate times.  He was Director of the Hartford Institute of Criminal and Social Justice, Director of Research and Evaluation for New York City’s Addiction Services Agency, and a Program Officer at the Ford Foundation. He and his wife, whenever possible, live in Buonconvento, Italy.

David Kennedy

Director, National Network for Safe Communities

David M. Kennedy is the director of the National Network for Safe Communities, a project of John Jay Col- lege of Criminal Justice in New York City. Mr. Kennedy and the National Network support cities implementing strategic interventions to reduce violence, minimize arrest and incarceration, enhance police legitimacy, and strengthen relationships between law enforcement and communities. These interventions have been evaluated and proven effective in a variety of settings by Campbell Collaboration, and are currently being implemented in Chicago, New Orleans, Baltimore, Oakland, and many other cities nationwide. Mr. Kennedy’s work has won two Ford Foundation Innovations in Government awards, the Herman Goldstein Award for Excellence in Problem-Oriented Policing, among many other distinctions. His latest book is Don’t Shoot, One Man, a Street Fellow- ship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America.

Marc Levin

Director, Center for Effective Justice at the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Marc A. Levin, Esq., is the director of the Center for Effective Justice at the Texas Public Policy Foundation, the state’s free-market think tank, and Policy Director of its Right on Crime initiative. In 2010, Levin developed the concept for the Right on Crime initiative, which has become the national clearinghouse for conservative criminal justice reforms. Mr. Levin led the drafting of the Right on Crime Statement of Principles in 2010, which has been signed by conservative luminaries such as Newt Gingrich, Jeb Bush, J.C. Watts, Ed Meese, and Rick Perry. In 2014, Mr. Levin was named one of the “Politico 50” in 2014, the magazine’s annual “list of thinkers, doers, and dreamers who really matter in this age of gridlock and dysfunction.” Mr. Levin has testified on criminal justice policy on four occasions before Congress and has testified before legislatures in states such as Texas, Nevada, Kansas, Wisconsin, and California. He has also met personally with leaders from the President to the Speaker of the U.S. House to share his ideas on criminal justice reform. Marc has published dozens of policy papers on criminal justice and his articles have appeared in newspapers such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Dallas Morning News. In 2007, he was honored in a resolution unanimously passed by the Texas House of Representatives that stated, “Mr. Levin’s intellect is unparalleled and his research is impeccable.” Mr. Levin served as a law clerk to Judge Will Garwood on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and Staff Attorney at the Texas Supreme Court.

Glenn E. Martin

President and Founder, JustLeadershipUSA

Glenn E. Martin is the President and Founder of JustLeadershipUSA (JLUSA), an organization dedicated to cutting the U.S. correctional population in half by 2030. His goal is to amplify the voice of the people most impacted, and to position them as reform leaders. JLUSA challenges the assumption that formerly incarcerated people lack the skills to thoughtfully weigh in on policy reform. Rather, JLUSA is based on the principle that people closest to the problem are also the people closest to its solution. Mr. Martin speaks from personal experience, having spent six years incarcerated in a New York State prison in the early 1990s. That experience has informed his career, which has been recognized with honors such as the 2017 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award and the 2014 Echoing Green Black Male Achievement Fellowship. Mr. Martin is also the founder of the #CLOSErikers campaign. Prior to founding JLUSA, he was Vice President at The Fortune Society, one of the most respected reentry organizations in the country, the Co-Director of the National HIRE Network at the Legal Action Center, and one of the Co-Founders of the Education from the Inside Out Coalition. Mr. Martin’s bold, unflinching leadership is recognized by leaders from across the political spectrum. Praise from Karol V. Mason, Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs is representative of the accolades he has received: “Thanks to you and so many other like you, we are on our way to restoring common sense to our corrections policies and correcting a terrible imbalance in this country.” Mr. Martin is a sought after public speaker and a frequent media guest appearing on national news outlets such as NPR, MSNBC, Fox News, CNN, Al Jazeera and CSPAN.

Carlos J. Martinez

Public Defender, Miami Dade, FL

Carlos J. Martinez, the first Hispanic elected Public Defender in the US, is Miami-Dade County’s Public Defender. He was elected in 2008, and re-elected in 2012 and 2016 without opposition. Mr. Martinez manages an office with a $30 million budget comprised of approximately 400 employees, handling approximately 75,000 cases each year. Prior to law school, Mr. Martinez worked his way up from being a car wash attendant to managing multiple gas stations for Exxon Company USA, including the most profitable station in the Southeastern US. In the Public Defender’s Office, Mr. Martinez represented thousands of clients before working as an administrator for more than a decade. He has instituted numerous programs to help troubled youth get on the right track. He has been active in addressing the crisis of minority children cycled from schools to prisons and in protecting the confidentiality of juvenile records. Mr. Martinez chaired the Representation Subcommittee of The Florida Bar’s Commission on the Legal Needs of Children, served on the Supreme Court of Florida Steering Committee on Drug Courts and the Steering Committee on Families and Children, a National Institute of Corrections’ National Advisory Committee, the Florida Blueprint Commission on Juvenile Justice, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice Zero Tolerance Task Force. And most recently, as government lawyer liaison to The Florida Bar Board of Governors. Mr. Martinez has served on technical assistance and training teams across the United States and Latin America, including the Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (Dominican Republic, Chile and Mexico), the Honduran National Office of Public Defense, and the Public Defender Offices in Schenectady County (NY), San Bernardino County (CA), Maricopa County (Phoenix, AZ), and Marion County (Indianapolis, IN).

Beth McCann

District Attorney, Denver, CO

Beth McCann was elected District Attorney of Denver in November 2016 and was sworn into office on January 10, 2017. She is the first female District Attorney in Denver’s history. Beth brings extensive prosecutorial, legal and managerial experience, proven leadership, and community perspective to the Denver DA’s office. Immediately prior to becoming District Attorney, Beth was the four-term state representative for House District 8 in central and northeast Denver. McCann was a leader in criminal justice matters and health care reform throughout her legislative career. Among her legislative achievements, McCann passed legislation to provide due process to young people facing possible charges as adults by requiring a court hearing, to make a person’s fourth DUI or DWAI conviction a Class 4 felony, and to establish a new approach to provide law enforcement, children, and their families a way to address delinquent behavior without entering the juvenile justice system. She passed legislation to require universal background checks for gun purchases and to keep guns away from convicted domestic violence abusers and other dangerous individuals and a law to strictly limit the use of isolation cells for juveniles in jails or prisons. McCann also passed a landmark human trafficking bill which strengthened Colorado’s human trafficking laws and established a statewide council to address this devastating activity. She also passed a law to provide funding for survivors of domestic violence and a law to prohibit gender bias in health insurance premiums. As Chair of the Health, Insurance and Environment Committee, Beth was instrumental in overseeing the creation of the Colorado Health Insurance Exchange and bringing Colorado laws into alignment with federal law. Beth McCann started the CLAW caucus (Colorado Legislators for Animal Welfare) and sponsored the law to create the animal shelter license plate and a bill to allow emergency responders to ad- minister emergency care to pets. Beth McCann began her legal career as a law clerk for Colorado’s U.S. District Court Judge Sherman G. Finesilver. She then served almost eight years as a deputy and then Chief Deputy District Attorney in Denver, prosecuting hundreds of cases, including child abuse and murders. Her career included eight years in private practice with the Denver law firm of Cooper & Kelley, and she earned a partnership in that firm in 1985. McCann was Denver’s first female Manager of Safety in the early 1990s under Mayor Wellington Webb, and the first director of Denver’s Safe City program to help kids stay out of gangs, drugs and violence. Juvenile crime decreased by over 20% following the establishment of this program. Before becoming a state legislator, Beth McCann was Deputy Attorney General for Civil Litigation and Employment Law in the Colorado Attorney General’s Office for 8 years, supervising 33 trial lawyers as well as their support staff. Beth McCann is a founding member and former president of the Colorado Women’s Bar Association, served as first Vice-Pres- ident of the Denver Bar Association and was on the Board of Governors of the Colorado Bar Association She also served on the Colorado Supreme Court/Court of Appeals Nominating Commission, and was a member of the Colorado Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice. She was chair of the Safety and Security Committee at Denver East High School and a coach of East’s Constitutional Scholars team. McCann also served on Governor John Hickenlooper’s transition team as a member of his public safety committee and on Denver Mayor Michael Hancock’s former search committee for a new chief of police.

Hillar Moore

District Attorney, Baton Rouge, LA

Hillar Moore completed his undergraduate degree in Criminal Justice at LSU in Baton Rouge. After graduating, Mr. Moore worked as an investigator for the East Baton Rouge District Attorney’s office for 12 years where he collected evidence and surveyed crime scenes. Mr. Moore received training from around the country in crime scene investigation and forensics. He also received crime scene training at the FBI Academy in Quantico. While working as an investigator, Mr. Moore completed class work towards a master’s degree in criminal justice and later attended and graduated from Southern University Law School, finishing Magna Cum Laude. After graduating law school, he then began working in private law practice. He maintained a private practice, specializing in criminal defense for 16 years. Mr. Moore realized his goal of returning to the District Attorney’s Office as the elected DA in 2009. He has brought new and innovative ideas to the DA’s office, while reaching out to community leaders. Mr. Moore exhibits a tireless work ethic to lead the staff and serve East Baton Rouge Parish. Mr. Moore is known and respected throughout the community, maintaining the highest Martindale Hubble rating of “AV” for an attorney. Without opposition, Mr. Moore was reelected as District Attorney in 2014. He also serves as president of the Louisiana District Attorney’s Association.

Jean Peters Baker

County Prosecutor, Kansas City, MO

Jean Peters Baker has spent more than 15 years in the Jackson County Prosecutor’s Office, serving in nearly every unit of the office before she was appointed prosecutor in May 2011 and elected to the position in November 2012. She is only the second woman elected to lead the office; the first, now-U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, hired Ms. Peters Baker as a young assistant prosecutor. Ms. Peters Baker’s focus as prosecutor has been to make Jackson County a safer and better place to live, work and raise a family. Ms. Peters Baker has set an office goal to more closely connect the prosecutor’s office to the community and more smartly address and reduce crime, especially violent crime. In 2012, Ms. Peters Baker initiated a new violence reduction effort that now is known as the Kansas City No Violence Alliance. Led by a governing board that includes Ms. Peters Baker, Mayor Sly James, Kansas City Police Chief Darryl Forte’ and U.S. Attorney Tammy Dickinson, the effort is an evidence-based or proven approach known as focused deterrence. In 2014, homicides in Kansas City fell to the lowest level in four decades. Jean’s office attracted national attention in 2011, after a Jackson County grand jury indicted the bishop of the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph, making him the highest ranking cleric in the United States to face a criminal charge related to church’s child sex abuse scandal. In October 2013, Baker was named special prosecutor to investigate the filing of charges in a high-profile sexual assault involving high school football players, once again attracting national attention.

Charles H. Ramsey

Former Police Commissioner, Philadelphia Police Department

Charles H. Ramsey was appointed Police Commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Department on January 7, 2008. He retired in January 2016 after serving 8 years as Commissioner and leading the fourth largest police department in the nation. Commissioner Ramsey brings over forty-seven years of knowledge, experience and service in advancing the law enforcement profession in three different major city police departments, Chicago, Washington, DC and Philadelphia. In December 2014, President Barrack Obama chose Commissioner Ramsey to serve as co-chair of the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing. He currently serves as an advisor to the United States Conference of Mayors, a Distinguished Visiting Fellow of the Lindy Institute at Drexel University and serves on the National Infrastructure Advisory Council. In December 2015, the City of Philadelphia named the Philadelphia Police Department Training Academy Auditorium the Charles H. Ramsey Training and Education Auditorium in his honor.

Lucy Lang

Executive Director, Institute for Innovation in Prosecution

Lucy Lang is the Executive Director of the Institute for Innovation in Prosecutions. Previously, she was a Manhattan Assistant District Attorney for 12 years, serving most recently as Special Counsel for Policy and Projects and Executive Director of the DA’s in-house think tank, the Manhattan DA Academy.  In addition to her breadth of experience as a prosecutor, which includes multi-year wiretapping investigations, complex gang and murder trials, and appellate practice, Lang has run Manhattan’s Intelligence Driven Prosecution Symposium and pioneered a first-of-its-kind college in prison class in which incarcerated students study criminal justice alongside prosecutors. 

Lang is a graduate of Swarthmore College, where she serves on the Board of Managers, and Columbia Law School, where she was the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Gender and Law and serves as a Lecturer-in-Law.  Lang was named a 2015 Rising Star by the New York Law Journal, was a 2017 Presidential Leadership Scholar, and is a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. 

Jeff Robinson

Deputy Legal Director & Director, Trone Center for Justice and Equality

Jeff Robinson is a Deputy Legal Director and the Director of the Trone Center for Justice and Equality, which houses the ACLU’s work on criminal and racial justice and reform issues. Since graduating from Harvard Law School in 1981, Jeff has three decades of experience working on these issues. For seven years, he represented indigent clients in state court at The Defender Association and then in federal court at the Federal Public Defender’s Office, both in Seattle.  In 1988, Jeff began a 27 year private practice at the Seattle firm of Schroeter, Goldmark & Bender where he represented a broad range of clients in local, state, and federal courts on charges ranging from shoplifting to securities fraud and first degree murder. He has tried over 200 criminal cases to verdict and has tried more than a dozen civil cases representing plaintiffs suing corporate and government entities. Jeff was one of the original members of the John Adams Project, which enabled him to work on the behalf of one of five men held at Guantanamo Bay charged with carrying out the 9-11 attacks. In addition to being a nationally recognized trial attorney, Jeff is also a respected teacher of trial advocacy. He is a faculty member of the National Criminal Defense College in Macon, Georgia, and has lectured on trial skills all over the United States. He has also spoken nationally to diverse audiences on the role of race in the criminal justice system. He is past President of the Washing- ton Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and a life member and past member of the board of directors of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Jeff is also an elected fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers.

Dan Satterberg

Prosecuting Attorney, King County, WA

Dan Satterberg has served in the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office (KCPAO) for more than three decades, and was first elected to lead the office in November 2007. He served as Chief of Staff to Norm Maleng for 17 years, and was responsible for the management and operation of the KCPAO. The KCPAO has 236 attorneys, and a total staff of more than 500. Together with community partners, Mr. Satterberg has created successful programs to keep young people engaged in school and divert youth from the courtroom to a motivational intervention called “The 180 Program”. His office has also partnered diversion programs to help families with juvenile domestic violence, and explore the potential of restorative justice to address youth violence. The KCPAO is a founding partner in the creation of LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion), a national model creating a compassionate response to drug-addicted people, and giving police additional tools for responding to people with addiction and mental health issues. Further work is being done in King County to identify and assist frequent utilizers of the jail before their next arrest. Dan believes that we need to do more to help people leaving prison make a successful transition, and he is committed to reducing recidivism among returning citizens. He is the co chair of the Washington State Reentry Council. Mr. Satterberg is also the host of “Community Justice Radio”, on KVRU FM 105.7, and of the cable TV show, “The Prosecutor’s Partners,” each an outlet to interview people in the community making a difference for justice. He graduated from the UW undergraduate school (Political Science and Journalism) and the UW Law School. He has two adult children and has been married for more than 30 years. He also plays bass and sings in the classic rock cover band, “The Approximations.”

David Sklansky

Stanley Morrison Professor of Law , Stanford Law School

David Alan Sklansky is the Stanley Morrison Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Criminal Justice Center. He teaches and writes about criminal law, criminal procedure, and evidence. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, he taught at UC Berkeley and UCLA, and before that he worked for seven years as a federal prosecutor in Los Angeles. He is the author of Democracy and the Police (Stanford Univ. Press 2008), and the co-editor of Prosecutors and Democracy: A Cross-National Study (Cambridge Univ. Press, forthcoming 2017).

Carter Stewart

Managing Director, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation

Carter Stewart is a Managing Director at Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation. He supports investment selection, builds portfolio support, cultivates fund development and drives strategic and operational leadership. Mr. Stewart comes to DRK from the U.S. Department of Justice where he served as the presidentially appointed United States Attorney for the Southern District of Ohio. In this role, he was responsible for prosecuting federal crime in a district comprised of 5.5 million people. In this role, Stewart emphasized deterrence, crime prevention and alternatives to incarceration. He created the district’s first community outreach position and established a community leadership committee geared towards building trust and improving communication between the public and law enforcement. He created the district’s first diversion program to allow individuals a means of avoiding a felony record while still being held accountable for their wrong-doing. Stewart took a leadership role at DOJ in addressing inequities in the criminal justice system through his work raising awareness about the school to prison pipeline and by chairing a working group of U.S. Attorneys focused on reducing racial disparities in the federal system. Stewart also served on the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee and chaired the Attorney General’s Child Exploitation Working Group. Stewart previously served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in San Jose, CA, and he was a litigator at Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP in Columbus, OH and Bingham McCutchen LLP in San Francisco, CA. Stewart received a J.D. degree from Harvard Law School in 1997, a Master of Arts in Education Policy from Columbia University and received his undergraduate degree in Political Science from Stanford University. After law school, Stewart clerked for the Honorable Robert L. Carter, U.S. District Judge in the Southern District of New York and the Honorable Raymond L. Finch, U.S. District Court Judge for the District of the Virgin Islands.

Jeremy Travis

Senior Vice President of Criminal Justice, Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Jeremy Travis is the Senior Vice President of Criminal Justice at the Laura and John Arnold Foundation. Prior to this role, he served as President of John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York. As a Senior Fellow in the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center, he launched a national research program focused on prisoner reentry into society. From 1994 2000, Travis directed the National Institute of Justice, the research arm of the U.S. Department of Justice. Prior to his service in Washington, he was Deputy Commissioner for Legal Matters for the New York City Police Department (1990-1994), a Special Advisor to New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch (1986-89), and Special Counsel to the Police Commissioner of the NYPD (1984-86). Before joining city government, Travis spent a year as a law clerk to then-U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg. He began his career in criminal justice working as a legal services assistant for the Legal Aid Society, New York’s indigent defense agency. He has taught courses on criminal justice, public policy, history and law at Yale College, the New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York Law School and George Washington University. He has a J.D. from the New York University School of Law, an M.P.A. from the New York University Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and a B.A. in American Studies from Yale College. He is the author of But They All Come Back: Facing the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry (Urban Institute Press, 2005), coeditor (with Christy Visher) of Prisoner Reentry and Crime in America (Cambridge University Press, 2005), and co-editor (with Michelle Waul) of Prisoners Once Removed: The Impact of Incarceration and Reentry on Children, Families, and Communities (Urban Institute Press, 2003). He has published numerous book chapters, articles and monographs on constitutional law, criminal law and criminal justice policy.

Cyrus Vance

District Attorney, New York County, NY

Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., was first inaugurated as the District Attorney of New York County on January 1, 2010. Over the following four years, Mr. Vance enhanced the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office as a national leader in criminal justice by expanding the offices expertise on an array of 21st century crimes, including identity theft, cybercrime, white-collar fraud, hate crimes, terrorism, domestic violence, human trafficking, and violent and gang-related crimes. Upon taking office, Mr. Vance modernized the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office by reorganizing its resources and creating new specialized bureaus and units, including the Crime Strategies Unit, Forensic Science/Cold Case Unit, Cybercrime and Identity Theft Bureau, Major Economic Crimes Bureau, Special Victims Bureau, Violent Criminal Enterprises Unit, Hate Crimes Unit, and the Public Corruption Unit. As District Attorney, Mr. Vance’s many achievements include the takedown of numerous violent street gangs, dismantling of several major domestic and international cybercrime and identity theft operations, the first convictions of individuals on State terror charges in New York State Court, and the recovery of billions of dollars from international financial institutions that had been engaged in violating international sanctions for the benefit of countries like Iran, Libya, and Sudan. Mr. Vance was reelected on November 5, 2013, and began his second term with a strong record of significantly reducing crime in Manhattan. In July 2011, Mr. Vance was elected by his peers to serve as President of the District Attorneys Association of the State of New York for the 2012 term. Mr. Vance also serves as co-chair of the New York State Permanent Commission on Sentencing. Mr. Vance was born and raised in Manhattan, and is a graduate of Yale University and Georgetown University Law Center. He and his wife, Peggy McDonnell, currently reside on the Upper West Side and have two grown children.

Tori Verber Salazar

District Attorney, San Joaquin County, CA

Tori Verber Salazar is the first woman elected to the Office of District Attorney of San Joaquin County. Tori began her term after being a member of the office for 27 years starting as a part-time clerk to prosecuting gang related homicides. She has implemented office wide changes including the 3-6-9 program requiring cases to receive a preliminary hearing within 3 months, resolved at 6 or set for trial by 9 months. She created the Political Integrity Unit to prosecute corruption cases. In her first 24 months, she has successfully brought forth a number of cases. She also serves as an executive member on the Community Correction Partnership (CCP) overseeing the annual implementation of 22 million dollars throughout the County allocated by AB-109. She is a founding member of the READY to Work Program, a 9-12 month live-in residential program for the homeless and previously incarcerated individuals. She is co-creator of the Beyond Incarceration Program, which allows junior and high school students to speak directly with inmates from Chowchilla Women’s Prison and Folsom Men’s State Prison. The program provides insight into what life is like behind bars. In partnership with Stanford School of Law, they have become leaders in pioneering substantive change in how officer involved fatalities are investigated and prosecuted. The partnership created an open dialogue and real change not only for San Joaquin County, but also throughout the State. Her greatest honor is serving the great people of San Joaquin County and being mother to 3 wonderful children.

Lynneice Washington

District Attorney, Jefferson County, AL

Lynneice O. Washington is a resident of Bessemer, Alabama, and former Presiding Judge of Bessemer Municipal Court. In addition to duties as presiding judge for six years, she served as appellate prosecutor for the City of Irondale; served as hearing officer for the Jefferson County Personnel Board; and, maintained a full-time law practice. Her latest political conquest of winning the November 8th election historically defines her as the first African American District Attorney in Jefferson County and first African American woman District Attorney for the State of Alabama. She serves as District Attorney for the Bessemer Cutoff Division of Jefferson County. DA Washington is a 1995 Cum Laude graduate of Miles Law School. She was admitted to the Alabama State Bar in September 1996. DA Washington is a 1990 graduate of Auburn University at Montgomery earning a BS Degree in Criminal Justice. Throughout her legal career, DA Washington has served with a number of legal and civic organizations. She’s a mentor with P.I.N.K. (Professional Individuals Nurturing Knowledge); member of the Bessemer Bar Association; active member and 2014 Past President of the Bessemer Rotary Club; serves as Advisory Board member with Brenda’s Brown Bosom Buddies (BBBB), a cancer awareness organization; serves as member of the Bessemer Domestic Violence Task Force to name a few. In addition to legal and civic duties, DA Washington is a wife, mother and Christian. She is a proud and active member of New Bethlehem Baptist Church; and she is also a strong 2010 breast cancer survivor. DA Washington has been recognized by a number of community, civic and legal organizations for her involvement and activism in the community. She is married and together they share four children – one son and three daughters.

Ronald Wright

Law Professor, Wake Forest University

Ron Wright is a professor of criminal law at Wake Forest University. He is the co-author of two casebooks in criminal procedure and sentencing and his empirical research concentrates on the work of criminal prosecutors. He has served as a board member for the Prosecution and Racial Justice Project of the Vera Institute of Justice, Families Against Mandatory Minimum Sentences (FAMM), North Carolina Prisoner Legal Services, Inc., and the Winston-Salem Citizens’ Police Review Board. Prior to joining the faculty, he was a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice, prosecuting antitrust and other white-collar criminal cases.

Ellen Yaroshefsky

Howard Lichtenstein Professor of Legal Ethics & Director , Monroe Freedman Institute for the Study of Legal Ethics

Ellen Yaroshefsky is the Howard Lichtenstein Professor of Legal Ethics and Director of the Monroe Freedman Institute for the Study of Legal Ethics at the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University. She teaches a range of ethics courses, organizes symposia and writes and lectures in the field of legal ethics. Ms. Yaroshefsky counsels lawyers and law firms and serves as an expert witness. She served as a Commissioner on the New York State Joint Commission on Public Ethics and was the co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Ethics, Gideon and Professionalism Committee of the Criminal Justice Section. She serves on the New York State Committee on Standards of Attorney Conduct, on ethics committees of state and local bar associations and currently co-chairs the Ethics Committee of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. From 1994-2016 she was a Clinical Professor of Law and the Director of the Jacob Burns Center for Ethics in the Practice of Law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in New York. Prior to joining the Cardozo faculty, she was an attorney at the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York and then in private practice. She has received a number of awards for litigation and received the New York State Bar Association award for “Outstanding Contribution in the Field of Criminal Law Education.”