• Our Work

    The National Network supports cities implementing proven strategic interventions to reduce violence and improve public safety, minimize arrest and incarceration, and strengthen relationships between law enforcement and the communities it serves.


Guides

Group Violence Intervention: An Implementation Guide

A comprehensive guide to the National Network's Group Violence Intervention strategy. This guide covers all relevant steps to the strategy from initial planning and problem analysis to enforcement actions and call-in implementation, and further considers issues of maintenance, integrity, sustainability and accountability to offer interested parties a step-by-step guide to successfully implementing GVI in any jurisdiction.

Group Violence Intervention

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Custom Notifications: Individualized Communication in the Group Violence Intervention

This guide provides practical information about "custom notifications," an independent element of GVI that enables quick, tactical, direct communication to particular group members. This publication presents the custom notifications process, explains its value within the broader strategy, details its use by several national practitioners, and encourages further development.

Group Violence Intervention

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Managing the Group Violence Intervention: Using Shooting Scorecards to Track Group Violence

This guide begins with a brief description of the shooting scorecard concept and its links to problem analysis and performance measurement systems in police departments. It then presents the key steps in the process and associated data quality issues and then details the use of shooting scorecards by the Boston Police Department as an example of the practical applications of this approach.

Group Violence Intervention

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Call-In Preparation and Execution Guide

A complete guide for law enforcement, community, and social services partners already engaged in implementing the Group Violence Intervention to design, prepare, and execute their first and subsequent call-ins.

Group Violence Intervention

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Four Case Studies of Swift and Meaningful Law Enforcement

For the Group Violence Intervention to achieve its desired outcomes, stakeholders must be authentic and their messages credible. For law enforcement this means making good on the promise of swift and meaningful consequences for a group or gang as a whole when a prohibited violent act (usually shooting or killing) is committed by one of its members. This document captures examples of successful and creative law enforcement responses to group violence as carried out by police departments and their partner agencies in key National Network jurisdictions.

Group Violence Intervention

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Pulling Levers Focused Deterrence Strategies to Prevent Crime

This paper briefly reviews the research on the crime control effectiveness of "pulling levers" focused deterrence programs. Focused deterrence strategies honor core deterrence ideas, such as increasing risks faced by offenders, while finding new and creative ways of deploying traditional and non-traditional law enforcement tools to do so, such as communicating incentives and disincentives directly to targeted offenders.

Group Violence Intervention

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The Effects of “Pulling Levers” Focused Deterrence Strategies on Crime

This report is a meta-analysis that evaluates impact on homicide and violence in a variety of cities that have implemented our Group Violence Intervention or the Drug Market Intervention.

Group Violence Intervention

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Drug Market Intervention: An Implementation Guide

The guide to the Drug Market Intervention provides practical information intended to help law enforcement, community, and social services partners prepare and successfully execute DMI to close overt drug markets.

Drug Market Intervention

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The High Point Drug Market Intervention Strategy (2009)

This publication sets out the compelling story of High Point’s original Drug Market Intervention work and describes how the intervention was successfully duplicated in Providence, Rhode Island.

Drug Market Intervention

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Drug Market Strategy: Basic Implementation Steps

A 9-step outline of the fundamental work and partnerships involved in the strategy.

Drug Market Intervention

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Practice Brief: Keeping Drug Markets Closed--The High Point Protocol

Since pioneering the Drug Market Intervention in 2004, the city of High Point, NC has developed a protocol to ensure that the five street drug markets it successfully shut down stay closed. This paper summarizes the key componentens of its maintenance protocol.

Drug Market Intervention

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Practice Brief: Norms, Narrative and Community Engagement for Crime Prevention (Community Moral Voice)

The norms and narratives held by offenders and potential offenders; communities; and law enforcement have tremendous impact on crime and crime prevention, how each party views the others, and their actions; and their willingness to work together. This paper addresses the practical aspects of addressing and even changing norms and narratives in crime prevention.

Drug Market Intervention

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Pulling Levers Focused Deterrence Strategies to Prevent Crime

This paper briefly reviews the research on the crime control effectiveness of "pulling levers" focused deterrence programs. Focused deterrence strategies honor core deterrence ideas, such as increasing risks faced by offenders, while finding new and creative ways of deploying traditional and non-traditional law enforcement tools to do so, such as communicating incentives and disincentives directly to targeted offenders.

These evaluation designs permit the clearest assessment of “cause and effect” in determining whether hot spots policing programs prevent crime. These designs examine pre- and post-program measurement of crime outcomes in targeted locations relative to “control” locations.  The control groups in the identified hot spots evaluations received routine levels of traditional police enforcement tactics. The deterrence message was a promise to gang members that violent behavior would evoke an immediate and intense response from law enforcement.

Drug Market Intervention

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The Effects of “Pulling Levers” Focused Deterrence Strategies on Crime

This report is a meta-analysis that evaluates impact on homicide and violence in a variety of cities that have implemented our Group Violence Intervention or the Drug Market Intervention.

Drug Market Intervention

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Racial Reconciliation, Truth Telling, and Police Legitimacy (2012)

This report discusses issues raised at an executive session hosted by the COPS Office and the National Network for Safe Communities in Washington, D.C. on January 11, 2012.

Reconciliation

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Drugs, Race, and Common Ground: Reflections on the High Point Intervention

At the 2008 National Institute of Justice Conference, David Kennedy talked about his work to combat drug markets, especially the High Point Intervention, an innovative program now being replicated in over 19 sites nationally under the Drug Market Intervention strategy.  This article is based on his remarks.

Reconciliation

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Practice Brief: Norms, Narrative and Community Engagement for Crime Prevention (Community Moral Voice)

The norms and narratives held by offenders and potential offenders, communities; and law enforcement have tremendous impact on crime and crime prevention, how each part views the others, and their actions; and their willingness to work together. Recent work has shown that norms and narratives can be directly addressed and even changed, with enormous practical impact. This practice brief addresses the practical aspects of addressing "norms and narratives" in crime prevention.

Reconciliation

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Strengthening the Relationship Between Law Enforcement and Communities of Color

On April 4, 2014, the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) hosted a conference with law enforcement officials, civil rights activists, academic experts, community leaders, and policymakers at the Ford Foundation offices in New York City. This forum was the first in a series of forums focusing on building trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve. This publication, recently published by COPS at DOJ, is a great outline of the first of many forums to focus on building trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve. 

Reconciliation

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Custom Notifications: Individualized Communication in the Group Violence Intervention

Custom Notifications: Individualized Communication in the Group Violence Intervention provides practical information about "custom notifications," an independent element of GVI that enables quick, tactical, direct communication to particular group members.  Custom notifications articulate that group members are valued members of the community, give individualized information about their legal risk, and offer opportunities for help.  They effectively interrupt group "beefs," avoid retaliation after incidents, calm outbreaks of violence, and reinforce the GVI message.

Custom Notifications

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IPVI Issue Brief

The Intimate Partner Violence Intervention (IPVI) is an offender-focused, victim-centered approach
that addresses the most serious intimate partner violence. This issue brief provides a succinct summary of IPVI strategy and its history of implementation. 

Intimate Partner Violence Intervention

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A New Approach to Reducing Intimate Partner Violence

The Intimate Partner Violence Intervention (IPVI) uses the National Network principles that have informed effective interventions against homicide, gun violence, drug markets, and other critical public safety problems and applies them to intimate partner violence.

Intimate Partner Violence Intervention

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Operation Place Safety: First Year in Review

This report discussed the outcomes of the first year of Operation Place Safety, which uses the principles of the Group Violence Intervention to deter violence in a closed custody unit of Washington Department of Corrections.

Prison Violence Intervention

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Framework for a Data-driven Crime Prevention Prosecutor’s Office

The National Network has typically designed the law enforcement component of its violence intervention strategies through partnership with police departments. However, it is entirely possible to imagine a prosecutor’s office organized to conduct its work consistent with violence reduction goals. This paper outlines a basic direction and design for a fundamental reconception of the function and office of the prosecutor.

Strategic Prosecution

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Managing Drug Involved Probationers with Swift and Certain Sanctions: Evaluating Hawaii’s HOPE

This publication evaluates Hawaii Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE), a program using the SCF framework to deter reoffending by high-risk probationers. 

Swift, Certain, & Fair

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Swift, Certain, and Fair Warning Hearing

This is an example of a swift, certain and fair warning hearing written by Judge Steven Alm.

Swift, Certain, & Fair

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WISP: What have we learned? Presentation to the Seattle City Council

The Washington Intensive Supervision Program (WISP) started in February 2011 as a pilot project in Seattle to test whether the principles of SCF community supervision could succeed for higher risk parolees as well as probationers. With the aid of individuals involved in the original HOPE program, and a remarkable level of coordination and motivation among WISP staff, WISP quickly achieved a high degree of fidelity to the original HOPE model.

WISP clients differed significantly from those previously successfully supervised by SCF programs. As one of the first SCF programs to supervise parolees, WISP generally supervised individuals with longer and more serious criminal histories than previous programs. WISP clients also had a wider variety of drug abuse problems, with heroin in particular being a notable challenge.

The pilot was such a success that in April 2012, the state legislature overwhelming passed a law rolling out the program statewide. In rapid fashion, approximately 17,000 offenders supervised out of 113 field offices were oriented into WISP.

Swift, Certain, & Fair

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Support & Outreach White Paper

This white paper outlines a new "support and outreach" structure carefully tailored to the core street population, it's situation, and its needs. 

Support and Outreach

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Cincinnati Support & Outreach

The Cincinnati Initiative to Reduce Violence (CIRV) has become a model for implementing our innovative support and outreach framework. 

Support and Outreach

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